Dearest Kehilla

Another week has passed, another week of uncertainty as to where the world is headed. I hope you are all managing during this difficult time and I ask that Hashem bless you to stay safe and well. 

Over the past week I have spoken to many people within our community. Whilst I can’t see you all face-to-face, it is nice to at least maintain a connection over the phone. During one of my conversations, I realised just how good the call made ME feel. Like many times in life, when you give, you don’t just benefit the recipient, but also yourself. 

Perhaps this answers a question I have always had at the Seder. We begin the section of Magid by raising the ‘bread of our affliction’ (Ha lachma anya) and then inviting guests to our seder (‘Kol dicchfin yesei veyiftach’). But wait a minute, surely, the guests have already been invited!? Perhaps this is the meaning. If you wish to truly experience freedom, you need to be able to reach beyond yourself towards another. Perhaps the invitation is really meant for you! 

Here is a short message I made on this subject. 

This Shabbat, the Shabbat before Pesach, is called Shabbat Hagadol – the ‘Great’ Shabbat. It’s on this Shabbat that we remember how the Jews of Egypt, isolated in their homes, took a lamb and readied themselves to fulfil G-d’s command of the first Pesach sacrifice and ultimately, the redemption. This week is also Parashat Tzav, meaning ‘connection’. We hope that from our homes of isolation, we too are able to experience ‘greatness’, increased ‘connection’ and hopefully very soon, redemption. 

As always, we provide you with the following means of maintaining your inspiration, spiritual growth and community connection. 

Wishing you and yours Shabbat Shalom, Pesach Chag Kasher Vesameach and stay safe!

Rabbi Yossi and Chana Raizel Friedman